Jul 22, 2024  
2021-2022 Graduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Graduate Catalog [FINAL EDITION]

School of Nursing


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School of Nursing Overview

Widener’s School of Nursing BSN, MSN, and DNP programs are fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. The MSN Family (Individual across the Lifespan) CRNP is also approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing.

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)
One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120
Phone: 202-887-6791

State Board of Nursing, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
P. O. Box 2649, Harrisburg, PA 17105-2649
Phone: 717-783-7142

Vision

The Widener University School of Nursing (SON) aspires to be a preeminent metropolitan school of nursing recognized for developing clinically prepared, scientifically oriented, technologically proficient, professional nurses who provide leadership as clinicians, educators, scholars, and researchers to transform the health and quality of life of diverse communities.

Mission and Core Values

Mission

Empowering an interprofessional community of learners to advance health through practice, scholarship, leadership, and innovation.

Core Values

  • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
    We embrace diversity, equity, and inclusion in all that we do.
  • Excellence
    We hold ourselves to the highest standards of excellence in education, practice, scholarship, and service.
  • Respect
    We care for and honor the dignity of all in our community and those we serve.
  • Integrity
    We hold ourselves and our community to high personal and professional ethical standards.
  • Courage
    We embrace opportunities to advocate and innovate to advance the health of our
    community and the strengthening of our professions.
  • Professionalism
    We believe that professionalism encompasses a professional identity that
    demonstrates accountability, a collaborative spirit, cultural sensitivity, humility, and social justice.

Goals

  • Foster a SON community whose members are diverse and where our students are prepared for living and serving in a pluralistic and ever-changing world.
  • Achieve an unparalleled academic environment by promoting rigorous educational programs, productive scholarship, and lifelong learning.
  • Create a student-centered living and learning experience that supports the achievement of academic excellence by nursing students.
  • Promote the SON as a school known for offering programs that use experiential and collaborative learning, mentoring, and engaged teaching and that emphasize the linkage between the curricula and societal needs.
  • Expand and diversify the SON’s financial resources and manage its assets in an efficient and effective manner.
  • Make the SON an employer of first choice and a place that attracts talented people at all levels to work or volunteer to fulfill the mission of the SON.
  • Implement strategies to strengthen the integration of liberal arts and sciences and professional programs, and enrich our general education offerings to ensure that every undergraduate nursing student has common educational experiences involving civic engagement and experiential learning.
  • Foster an environment that encourages innovation in teaching, scholarship, and program development.
  • Raise the profile of the SON among metropolitan nursing leaders, the general public, and among the national professional nursing and higher education communities.
  • Optimize the SON’s enrollment to achieve a vital university community at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.
  • Address the metropolitan region’s most pressing health concerns and enhance our program offerings to respond to the needs of our communities.
  • Actively promote the development of leadership skills and provide opportunities for leadership experiences for nursing students, faculty, and alumni so that they may demonstrate civic and professional leadership.
  • Ensure academic excellence by maintaining the SON’s commitment to academic freedom and by upholding faculty governance, especially in matters pertaining to pedagogy, curriculum, and scholarship.

Outcomes

Nursing education has the mandate to both respond to and influence society and the health care system. To meet these responsibilities, the School of Nursing, through its various programs, produces graduates who can influence society and the health care system through their leadership. Program outcomes for the master’s and doctoral levels are as follows:

Outcome I—The master of science in nursing program provides opportunities for individuals to develop leadership in diverse health care settings as advanced practitioners. Graduates of the master’s program use knowledge in a specialized area of nursing and in related sciences and humanities to improve health care in a variety of cultures and settings. Graduates are prepared to use nursing theories and research findings to guide and enhance evidence-based practice. The master’s program serves as a foundation for doctoral study.

Outcome II—The doctor of nursing practice program prepares advanced practice nurses to provide clinical leadership in the delivery of culturally competent, evidence-based, disease-state management or system-based care. Graduates are prepared for interprofessional collaboration and outcomes management to support the provision of quality and safety in complex health care systems.

Outcome III—The doctor of philosophy program prepares nurse scholars and educators and is based on the belief that nursing is a professional discipline with a unique role and body of knowledge. The primary goal of the doctor of philosophy program is the preparation of nurse scholars and leaders in nursing education. Graduates apply rigorous methods of disciplined inquiry to scholarship, teaching, research, and service to the profession and society.

Standards for Academic Integrity

Academic Integrity Policy

The Academic Integrity Policy was approved by the Faculty Council. Additional regulations are excerpted and paraphrased from the “Minutes of the Academic Council.” These regulations explain Widener University’s expectations regarding students’ academic conduct and describe procedures related to those expectations. Exceptions to the regulations may be made only by special action of the school/college academic councils of the Academic Review Board. References in this catalog refer to the Main Campus only.

Statement on Academic Integrity

Widener University strongly supports the concept of academic integrity and expects students and all other members of the Widener University community to be honest in all academic endeavors. Cheating, plagiarism, and all other forms of academic fraud are unacceptable; they are serious violations of university policy. In some circumstances, students’ conduct may require review under the research integrity policy, the freedom to learn policy, the judicial review policy, and other university policies. Widener University expects all students to be familiar with university policies on academic integrity, as outlined in this catalog. The university will not accept a claim of ignorance—either of the policy itself or of what constitutes academic fraud—as a valid defense against such a charge.

Violations of Academic Integrity

Violations of academic integrity constitute academic fraud. Academic fraud consists of any action that serves to undermine the integrity of the academic process or that gives the student an unfair advantage, including:

  • inspecting, duplicating or distributing test materials without authorization.
  • cheating, attempting to cheat, or assisting others to cheat.
  • altering work after it has been submitted for a grade.
  • plagiarizing.
  • using or attempting to use anything that constitutes unauthorized assistance.
  • fabricating, falsifying, distorting, or inventing any information, documentation, or citation.

Each student’s program may have on record additional specific acts particular to a discipline that constitutes academic fraud. These specific acts are specified in relevant handbooks or course syllabi.

Statement on Plagiarism

One of the most common violations of academic integrity is plagiarism. Plagiarism can be intentional or unintentional. However, since each student is responsible for knowing what constitutes plagiarism, unintentional plagiarism is as unacceptable as intentional plagiarism and commission of it will bring the same penalties. In many classes, faculty members will provide their definitions of plagiarism. In classes where a definition is not provided, students will be held to the definition of plagiarism that follows:

Definition of Plagiarism

Plagiarism—submitting the work of others as one’s own—is a serious offense. In the academic world, plagiarism is theft. Information from sources—whether quoted, paraphrased, or summarized—must be given credit through specific citations. When a student paraphrases a work, it is still necessary to cite the original source. Merely rearranging a sentence or changing a few words is not sufficient. The citation style should be appropriate for the discipline and should clearly indicate the beginning and ending of the referenced material. All sources used in the preparation of an academic paper must also be listed with full bibliographic details at the end of the paper, as appropriate in the discipline.

Faculty and Student Responsibilities

  • Every student, faculty member, and administrator is responsible for upholding the highest standards of academic integrity. Every member of the Widener community shall honor the spirit of this policy by refusing to tolerate academic fraud.
  • When expectations for a course are not addressed in this policy, it is the responsibility of the instructor to provide students with additional guidelines for what constitutes “authorized” and “unauthorized” assistance.
  • It is the responsibility of every student to seek clarification if in doubt about what constitutes “authorized” and “unauthorized” assistance. In cases of collaborative work, all students within the collaborative group may be responsible for “unauthorized” assistance to any individual student within the collaborative group.
  • Students are required to obtain permission prior to submitting work, any part of which was previously or will be submitted in another course. The instructor has the option of accepting, rejecting, or requiring modification of the content of previously or simultaneously submitted work.

A student who suspects that a violation of academic integrity has occurred should report that violation to the associate provost or their dean. In this report, the student should describe any action taken, such as talking with the person involved or with a faculty or staff member. Every effort will be made to preserve the anonymity of the student reporting the incident; however, confidentiality cannot be guaranteed.

Resolution at the Faculty/Student Level for Academic Fraud Occurring in a Course

Process and Reporting

A faculty member who becomes aware of possible academic fraud in a course will:

  1. Collect and preserve all evidence of the suspected fraud.
  2. Inform the suspected student(s) in writing. The faculty member may contact the associate provost for additional support and guidance.
  3. Provide the student with the opportunity to respond to the charges within five business days of his/her receipt of, or refusal to accept, notice of the suspected fraud. If the student fails to respond to this opportunity, the student forfeits any right to appeal the decision to the school or college level where the course is taught, and the faculty member will determine the penalty.
  4. Discuss the academic fraud with the student and agree to pursue student/faculty resolution. If no such agreement is reached, the faculty member refers the matter to the dean of the school or college level where the course is taught and will be processed at the school/college level.
  5. In cases where a faculty member takes action for a case of academic fraud, the faculty member will send a report describing the academic fraud and the penalty being imposed to the student, the dean of the school or college where the course involved is taught, the dean of the school or college where the student is enrolled, and the Office of the Associate Provost for Graduate Studies and Extended Learning as the office of record. Please contact the associate provost for guidelines and templates for constructing the reports.

If the faculty member is not satisfied with the sanctions available, he or she may refer the case to the dean responsible for the course in question.

If the student does not accept responsibility for the academic fraud or disagrees with the sanction imposed by the faculty member, the student may appeal the outcome at the school or college level according to the process stipulated in the bylaws or student handbook of the school or college where the course is taught.

Penalties

The suggested penalty for academic fraud in any course is failure in the course. However, faculty members may take alternative steps. Penalties available to faculty members include:

  • Formal warning.
  • Reduction in grade for the assignment.
  • Reduction in the grade for the course.
  • Failing grade for the assignment.
  • A failing grade (F) in the course.
  • A failing grade (XF) in the course (a grade of XF will appear on the transcript and be defined on the transcript as failure as a result of academic fraud).

Offenses Subject to Expulsion

All reports of academic fraud will be reviewed by the associate provost to verify whether reports have been received indicating that the student has been found responsible for any other act of academic fraud. In cases where the associate provost finds that the case is a repeat offense for which the student has received a failing grade (F or XF) in a course for each offense or a case in which a student has stolen or attempted to steal an examination, the associate provost will expel the student from the university. The student may appeal cases resulting in expulsion to the Academic Review Board.

Resolution at the School/College Level

Process and Reporting

When a faculty member or any other employee of the university becomes aware of possible academic fraud occurring outside a course, the faculty member or employee will:

  1. Collect and preserve all evidence of the suspected fraud.
  2. Refer the matter to the dean of the school or college where the student is enrolled.

When a case of academic fraud occurring in a course is referred to the dean of the school or college where the course is taught or when a case of academic fraud occurring outside a course is referred to the dean of the school or college where the student is enrolled:

  1. The dean will notify the student and the associate provost in writing of the charge of academic fraud, the penalty to be imposed, and all rights of appeal, if any.
  2. If a student wishes to contest the charge of academic fraud or disagrees with the sanction imposed, the student may do so according to the process stipulated in the bylaws or student handbook of the school or college where the course is taught. In such a case, the student will also be informed of the process as stipulated by the school or college.
  3. In cases where the penalty results in dismissal of the student from the school or college, the student may appeal the decision at the university level in writing to the Academic Review Board via the associate provost.

Penalties

The maximum penalty imposed in school or college resolution for individuals convicted of academic fraud shall be dismissal from the school or college. Lesser penalties may include:

  • Formal warning.
  • Reduction in grade for the assignment.
  • Reduction in the grade for the course.
  • Failing grade for the assignment.
  • Failing grade (F) in the course.
  • A failing grade (XF) in the course (a grade of XF will appear on the transcript and be defined on the transcript as failure as a result of academic fraud).
  • Required attendance at an academic integrity workshop or tutorial.

Offenses Subject to Expulsion

All reports of academic fraud will be reviewed by the associate provost to verify whether reports have been received indicating that the student has been found responsible for any other act of academic fraud. In cases where the associate provost finds that the case is a repeat offense where the student has received a failing grade (F or XF) in a course for each offense or a case where a student has stolen or attempted to steal an examination, the associate provost will expel the student from the university. The student may appeal cases resulting in expulsion to the Academic Review Board.

Resolution at the University Level—repeat Offenses / Theft of Examination Materials

Process

The associate provost will review all reports of academic fraud.

  1. If the associate provost finds the case is a repeat offense where the student has received a failing grade (F or XF) in a course for each offense, the associate provost will expel the student from the university. The student may appeal the case to the Academic Review Board.
  2. If the associate provost finds the case is a repeat offense where the student has not received a failing grade for both offenses, the case will be referred to the Academic Review Board.
  3. If the student has stolen or attempted to steal an examination, the associate provost will expel the student from the university. The student may appeal the case to the Academic Review Board.

Penalties

The maximum penalty imposed by the Academic Review Board for individuals convicted of academic fraud shall be expulsion from the university. Penalties include:

  • An XF grade in the course (a grade of XF will appear on the transcript and be defined on the transcript as failure as a result of academic fraud).
  • Removal of the privilege of representing the university in extracurricular activities, including athletics, as well as the privilege of running for or holding office in any student organization that is allowed to use university facilities or receives university funds.
  • Suspension from the university for up to one academic year. Students suspended for academic fraud cannot transfer into Widener any credits earned during the suspension.
  • Dismissal from the university. Students dismissed for academic fraud must apply for readmission according to the Academic Review Board guidelines. Readmission applications by students suspended for academic fraud must be approved by the Academic Review Board.
  • Expulsion from the university without the opportunity for readmission.

Reporting

The associate provost will send a report describing the academic fraud and the penalty being imposed to the student, the affected faculty members, the dean of the school or college where the course involved is taught, and the dean of the school or college where the student is enrolled, as well as maintain a copy as the office of record.

STUDENT APPEALS/DECISIONS—EXPULSION/DISMISSAL

When a student is expelled or dismissed by the associate provost, the student may initiate his or her appeal to the Academic Review Board by notifying the associate provost in writing of the request for an appeal, together with a concise statement of the grounds for the appeal.

Written notice of the student’s request for appeal, together with the concise statement of the student’s grounds for the appeal, must be received by the associate provost no more than ten business days following the decision of the faculty, school/college, or university.

When a case is referred to the Academic Review Board, the associate provost shall notify the student in writing of the time and location for the Academic Review Board hearing.

The membership of the Academic Review Board consists of the provost, the associate provost, the dean, the chair of the faculty, and the chair of the Faculty Council Academic Affairs Committee; provided, however, that any majority of the foregoing members shall constitute a quorum for purposes of conducting any matters to come before the Academic Review Board pursuant to these standards. Any faculty member on the Academic Review Board involved in the original accusations will not participate in deliberations in that case.

At an appeal before the Academic Review Board, the student shall have the opportunity to be heard and the right to produce witnesses or introduce evidence subject to the reasonable discretion of the Academic Review Board. The student may also be accompanied by a representative of his or her choosing who may not participate in the appeal. The Academic Review Board shall not be subject to any evidentiary rules but shall accept or reject evidence in its sound discretion. All appeals shall be closed to the public and no stenographic record shall be required unless requested at the expense of the requesting party. In the absence of a stenographic record, the Academic Review Board shall provide, in its sole discretion, either a recorded record or notes of the proceedings taken by a member of the Academic Review Board.

The results of all appeals to the Academic Review Board, permitted in the Academic Integrity Policy, shall be final.

Any matter submitted to a faculty member, the school/college, or the university for decision or review under this policy will be decided in a timely manner and the parties will use their best efforts to conclude the proceedings within the semester in which the alleged offense has occurred or the appeal is received, provided, however, that any delay in the proceedings will in no way operate as a waiver of the university’s right to assess any or all of the sanctions permitted hereunder. References to the associate provost also includes his/her designee, except with respect to membership on the Academic Review Board.

Academic Review Board

The Academic Review Board consists of the provost, the associate provost, the deans of each school/college, the vice chair of the University Council, and the chair of the University Council Academic Affairs Committee. Duties of the board include (1) hearing petitions for the waiver of academic regulations that transcend a single school or college (e.g., distribution or residency requirements, walk-through policy), and (2) serving as the appeal body in cases of an alleged violation of procedure in school/college Academic Council hearings.

Academic Grievance Appeal Procedure

Follow the process outlined in the School of Nursing Handbook for the student’s degree and program of study.

Graduation Requirements and Awarding of Degrees

Students are responsible for knowing and meeting curriculum requirements as shown in this catalog. To participate in commencement, all candidates must follow this graduation checklist: Petition for graduation. All degree candidates must petition to graduate online in the MyWidener. This should be done the semester prior to anticipated completion of all degree requirements.

Complete degree requirements. Contact the program director to verify completion of all degree requirements.

Complete the End of Program Interview. All degree candidates must schedule an appointment with the appropriate program director during their final semester of coursework.

Satisfy all financial and library obligations. To ensure clearance of all obligations, check their student account in MyWidener or call 610-499-4161. Degree candidates who have balances due at the Bursar’s Office or books due at the library must satisfy these obligations before they can receive diplomas.

Complete the loan exit interview. Degree candidates who borrowed a Federal Perkins or Federal Direct loan while enrolled at Widener University must attend an exit counseling session to review their rights and responsibilities. Sessions will be offered in April at varying times and will last approximately 30 minutes. A specific schedule of dates and times will be sent to graduation candidates by e-mail.

Obtain cap and gown. To attend the ceremony, degree candidates are required to wear the proper academic regalia.

Submit the online RSVP form. To be in the ceremony, degree candidates must fill out the online Commencement Participation RSVP Survey Form, which will be posted in March.

The university holds only one formal commencement in the spring to which August, December, and May graduates are invited.

Student Status

Students pursuing a course of study in the School of Nursing are considered to be full-time graduate students when they are enrolled in 9 or more credit hours of graduate study or when they are enrolled in NURS 900 - Dissertation Seminar I , NURS 901 - Dissertation Seminar II , or NURS 950 - Dissertation Advisement . It is recommended that students take no more than 9 credits of graduate study per semester.

Transcripts

Students in good financial standing may have copies of their transcripts forwarded to employers, agents, or institutions of higher education by ordering at www.getmytranscript.com

Financial Aid

Widener University offers a wide range of financial aid programs. Financial information is available on the university’s website at www.widener.edu/admissions/graduate/financial_aid.

Annual Notice to Students Regarding Education Records

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords eligible students certain rights with respect to their education records. (An “eligible student” under FERPA is a student who is 18 years of age or older or who attends a postsecondary institution.) These rights include:

  • The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days after the day the university receives a request for access. A student should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The university official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the university official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
  • The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA.

A student who wishes to ask the university to amend a record should write the university official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed, and specify why it should be changed.

If the university decides not to amend the record as requested, the university will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

  • The right to provide written consent before the university discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

The university discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to university officials with legitimate educational interests. A university official is a person employed by the university in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including, without limitation, law enforcement unit personnel, health staff, athletic coaches and trainers, and admissions counselors and recruiters); a person serving on the board of trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee. A university official also may include a volunteer or contractor outside of the university who performs an institutional service or function for which the university would otherwise use its own employees and who is under the direct control of the university with respect to the use and maintenance of PII from education records, such as an attorney, auditor, contractor, consultant, or collection agent, or a student volunteering to assist another university official in performing his or her tasks. A university official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the university.

Upon request, the university also discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. Such education records may include updated or corrected information, including, without limitation, disciplinary and health records.

  • The right to file a complaint with the U.S Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the university to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202

• The right to withhold public disclosure of any or all items of “directory information” by written notification to the Registrar’s Office of the university or the School of Law, as applicable, within two weeks after the commencement of the fall or spring semesters of any given academic year. Under current university policy, the term “directory information” includes, without limitation, a student’s name, home and campus address, telephone listing(s), electronic mail address, photographs, major field of study, grade level, enrollment status (e.g., undergraduate or graduate, full-time or part-time), dates of attendance, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, degrees, honors and awards received, and the most recent educational agency or institution attended.

Campus Safety

Campus Security and Fire Safety Reports

Widener is committed to the safety and security of all members of the Widener University community. The university’s annual Campus Safety and Fire Safety Reports are on the Widener website and contain information on campus security and personal safety, including crime prevention, university law enforcement authority, crime reporting policies, disciplinary procedures, and other campus security matters. The Campus Safety Reports contain statistics for the three previous calendar years on reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off-campus buildings and property owned and controlled by the university, and on public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from campus.

The Fire Safety Report contains information on fire safety systems in on-campus student housing facilities, the number of fire drills held during the previous year, the university’s policies on portable electrical appliances, smoking, and open flames in student housing facilities, the university’s procedures for student housing evacuation in the case of a fire, policies regarding fire safety education and training programs provided to students and employees, a listing of persons or organizations to which fires should be reported, and plans for future improvements in fire safety. It also contains statistics for the three most recent calendar years concerning the number of fires and cause of each fire in each on-campus student housing facility, the number of persons who received fire-related injuries that resulted in treatment at a medical facility, the number of deaths related to a fire, and the value of property damage caused by a fire.

The annual Campus Safety and Fire Safety Reports are available online at www.widener.edu/campussafety. If you would like a printed copy of these reports, contact the Campus Safety Office at 610-499-4203 to have a copy mailed to you. The information in these reports is required by law and is provided by the Campus Safety Office.

Master’s of Nursing (MSN)

Introduction

An undergraduate baccalaureate education that is both liberal and professional provides the foundation for the master’s program. The master’s program prepares graduates for leadership roles in advanced practice nursing in order to meet the diverse health needs of society. Graduates will function as advanced practice nurses in the health care delivery system using skills of analytical thinking and clinical decision making—plus advanced knowledge of theories in nursing, the sciences, and humanities—to improve health care in a variety of settings. In addition to the use of nursing and related theory, graduates are prepared to use research to inform evidence- based practice and influence health policy.

The program fosters collegial collaborative relationships with other health professionals. Since adult learners have unique needs and abilities, the master’s program provides students with a wide range of options for learning that take into account diverse backgrounds, past experiences, and future goals while providing a foundation for lifelong learning and doctoral study. Students participate in selecting their clinical learning experiences.

Graduates of the MSN Family (Individual across the Lifespan) CRNP option are prepared to sit for national certification by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP). Graduates of the MSN CNS Adult-Gerontology CNS option are prepared to sit for the American Nurses Credentialing Center national certification for adult-gerontology CNS or the American Association of Critical Care Nurses national certification for adult gerontology acute care CNS.

Student Learning Outcomes

With regard to expected student learning outcomes, MSN graduates will be able to:

  • Apply nursing, science, humanities, and ethical theories and information in the analysis of clinical problems, illness prevention, and health promotion strategies across diverse populations.
  • Analyze systems and work to create a culture of quality improvement and safety.
  • Use leadership knowledge and skills in initiating and maintaining effective working relationships and analyzing the impact of systems on patient outcomes.
  • Disseminate evidence-based practice decisions to advance clinical practice.
  • Use current technologies to deliver and coordinate care.
  • Analyze the political determinants of the system and how they influence health care system and patient outcomes.
  • Collaborate with other health professionals to manage and coordinate care across systems.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of clinical prevention interventions that affect individual and population-based health outcomes that are culturally appropriate.
  • Provide safe, quality care to diverse populations in a variety of settings and roles.

Admission

Applicants must submit evidence of the following:

  • Completed online application.
  • Bachelor’s degree in nursing or equivalent from an accredited program.
  • Minimum of 3.0 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale) in a BSN program.
  • Official transcripts from all previously attended institutions of higher education.
  • Completion of an undergraduate statistics/research course with a grade of C or better.
  • Two recommendations, preferably from professional nurses with graduate degrees, regarding applicant’s practice and potential for graduate work in nursing.
  • Valid U.S. license as a registered nurse. NP option requires PA State Board of Nursing licensure or as appropriate.
  • Satisfactory scores (550 written and 213 computer-based) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for all applicants from non-English speaking countries.
  • Current résumé.
  • Goal statement.

Applicants who meet all admission criteria except the 3.0 grade point average are eligible to complete two courses as a nonmatriculated student. The student should complete the application and contact the advisor to discuss course selection. If the applicant completes two nonmatriculated courses and attains a grade of B or better admission will be considered.

Nonmatriculated students are not eligible for financial aid. Applicants must apply online by visiting Widener’s home page at www.widener.edu. All admission requirements, including an interview, must be received and completed before:

  • June 1—for matriculation in the fall semester.
  • November 1—for matriculation in the spring semester.
  • March 1—for matriculation in summer sessions.

Additional Admission Requirements for International Applicants

International students should consult the International Student Services web page at www.widener.edu for international graduate student guidelines or contact the Office of International Student Services at Widener University; phone: 610-499-4499.

The School of Nursing requires a passing score on the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) Qualifying Examination. The CGFNS Qualifying Examination is a prerequisite for taking the Registered Nurse Licensing Examination in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Application materials are available from their website www.CGFNS.org, or:

CGFNS
3600 Market Street, Suite 400
Philadelphia, PA 19014-2651 U.S.A.
Phone: 215-349-8767

The registration deadlines are several months prior to their administration. Early application is essential.

Post-master’s Advanced Practice Certificates

Post-master’s (PM) certificates are available for the advanced practice (APRN) roles of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and family (individual across the lifespan) CRNP and for the Nurse Educator.

A post-master’s certificate for the CNS role is available for adult–gerontology. The focus of the certificate is on the development of the APRN role of the CNS for those individuals with a master’s degree in another nursing area. Length of time for completion varies based on a portfolio assessment of prior coursework, continuing education, and experience. The certificate can be completed in 18–24 months of part-time study. Required credits vary depending on prior education. A minimum of 500 hours of faculty-supervised advanced clinical practice is required for certification as a CNS.

The family (individual across the lifespan) CRNP certificate focuses on the development of an advanced practice nurse with expertise in providing primary health care to individuals and families across the life span using a holistic approach to management of family health through interdisciplinary collaboration. Required credits vary depending on prior education, the program is available at both the Harrisburg and Main Campuses, can be completed in 18–24 months of study; 672 hours of advanced clinical practice are required.

Graduates of the MSN family (individual across the lifespan) CRNP are prepared to sit for national certification by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP). Graduates of the MSN CNS program are prepared to sit for the American Nurses Credentialing Center national certification for adult-gerontology CNS or the American Association of Critical Care Nurses national certification for adult gerontology acute care CNS. NOTE: The clinical nurse specialist role is not recognized as an APRN role by the Pennsylvania Board of Nursing as it is other states.

The Nurse Educator PM certificate focuses on the development of pedagogical knowledge and teaching skills. This 15-credit program can be completed in 18-24 months; 240 clinical hours are required. 

Admission

Registered nurses with a master’s degree in nursing from an accredited program are eligible to apply for the post-master’s certificate programs. To apply, arrange for a personal interview and submit the following to the graduate nursing office:

  • Completed online application.
  • Transcript from the master’s degree program.
  • Two recommendations regarding applicant’s practice and potential for the program to which they are applying.
  • Valid U.S. license as a registered nurse. NP option requires PA State Board of Nursing licensure or as appropriate.
  • Goal statement related to FNP, CNS, or Nurse Educator role.

Information and an application may be obtained online by visiting our web site at www.widener.edu.

International Students Admission Process

International nursing students must submit the “Commission of Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) Credentials Evaluation” at the time of admission. Information is available from:

CGFNS
3600 Market Street, Suite 400
Philadelphia, PA 19014-2651 USA
Phone: 215-349-8767
Web site: www.CGFNS.org

Doctor of Philosophy

Goals

The primary goal of the doctor of philosophy (PhD) program of the Widener University School of Nursing is the preparation of nurse scholars and leaders in nursing education. Graduates will create and disseminate to the public new knowledge gained from disciplined inquiry related to nursing and nursing education.

Outcomes

Doctor of philosophy graduates will be able to:

  • Synthesize knowledge of the theoretical foundations of nursing and related fields, as well as education within the context of nursing education.
  • Integrate acquired knowledge into a philosophical and intellectual frame of reference that can be applied to nursing education.
  • Apply rigorous methods of disciplined inquiry.
  • Independently conduct and communicate research that advances and extends nursing knowledge and scholarship.
  • Evaluate curricular designs and outcomes based on internal and external contextual analysis.
  • Demonstrate leadership by addressing social, economic, political, and institutional forces in nursing higher education and health care practice.
  • Engage in scholarly discourse with colleagues, nurse scholars, and leaders.
  • Disseminate new knowledge gained from disciplined inquiry of concern to nursing and nursing education.

Matriculation

A matriculated student is one who has been accepted officially into the doctoral program. Two doctoral level courses may be taken before matriculation. Students may be required to complete supplemental course work either prior to admission or as part of the course of studies.

A nonmatriculated student is one who is taking a course for credit, but has not yet been accepted officially into the doctoral program. These students must submit the usual application for admission. No more than two courses earned by a student in a nonmatriculated status may be applied toward the degree in the event of later acceptance as a matriculated student.

Admission

Graduates of accredited master’s programs are invited to apply for admission by submitting evidence of:

  • Completed online application.
  • Transcripts from previously attended higher education institutions.
  • Minimum of 3.5 GPA (on a 4.0 scale) in the MSN program.
  • Graduate statistics course with a grade of at least B (3.0) is recommended.
  • Graduate course in nursing theories and conceptual models with a grade of at least B (3.0) is recommended.
  • Two references—one from an educator and one from an employer with a graduate degree. One of these must have a doctoral degree.
  • Interview with a School of Nursing faculty member (this is arranged after a preliminary review of application materials).
  • Curriculum vitae.
  • Statement explaining goals for doctoral work in nursing with emphasis on proposed area of specialization.

In addition, international students need satisfactory Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores. They should contact the International Student Services Office at 610-499-4499 for immigration requirements. More information can also be found online at www.widener.edu.

Registration

See information pertaining to registration under the master of science in nursing  program.

Academic Progress

Time Limit

A maximum of seven calendar years from the date of matriculation is allowed for completion of the requirements for the doctoral degree.

Continuous Enrollment

The doctoral program is designed for continuous enrollment of calendar year students in fall, spring, and summer semesters and for summer option students during four consecutive summers. To maintain matriculated status, students must be enrolled fall and spring semesters for the calendar year program or obtain an approved leave of absence. “Dissertation Advisement” (NURS 950 ) must be taken each fall, spring, and summer until dissertation is completed. Students who do not follow this policy will be dropped from the program.

Leave of Absence

Students in the calendar year program who do not take at least one course per semester must submit a written request for a leave of absence, including the rationale, to the program director for the semester in which they are not enrolled. Those who do not do so will be dropped from the program.

Students taking the summer option who do not take at least one course in each summer session in a given calendar year must submit a written request, including the rationale, to the program director, for the summer in which they are not enrolled. Those who do not do so will be dropped from the program.

A leave of absence will extend the time limit for completion of the doctoral program by the length of the leave. The total cumulative leave time applied to extensions shall not exceed two years. Exceptions to this policy will be referred to the director of
the PhD program.

Reinstatement to the Program

Students who have withdrawn from the program may petition for readmission by filing a new application. Such requests must be sent to the academic program director no later than 90 days prior to the start of the semester in which the student expects to enroll.

Transfer Students

Students who are matriculated in another doctoral program in nursing and wish to transfer will be considered on an individual basis.

Special Academic Policies

General policies are stipulated in the Widener University Graduate Student Handbook. Dismissal, readmission, academic requirements, and policies specific to the School of Nursing are found in the School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook.

Grading and Dismissal from the Program

  • Students are expected to maintain satisfactory progress toward a degree. A student’s doctoral studies record begins with the first course credited to the PhD degree and includes all subsequent courses.
  • PhD candidates are required to maintain at least a B (3.0) average. Only students with a 3.0 or better grade point average will graduate. Courses for which grades lower than B (3.0) are received may be repeated. No more than two repetitions total and only one repetition of a particular course is allowed. If a course is repeated, both grades will be recorded on the transcript, but only the most recent grade is used in calculating the grade point average. However, if a student is found to be in violation of Widener’s academic fraud policies, that student is prohibited from exercising the repeat-of-course option to remove the grade of F (given as a result of fraud) from the GPA calculation. A student whose academic performance is considered inadequate will be dismissed from the program.
  • Conduct inconsistent with the ethical and professional standards of the discipline, whether it occurs before or after matriculation, is also grounds for dismissal from the program. Such conduct includes academic fraud. A student dismissed for academic fraud may no longer enroll in the graduate programs of the university and may not apply for admission into another division of the university.
  • When a course is taken as a prerequisite for doctoral study, the grade will be recorded on the transcript with an asterisk, indicating that the course is not included in calculating the doctoral program grade point average.
  • Pass/no pass grading is used for grading NURS 900 /NURS 901  Dissertation Seminar and NURS 950 - Dissertation Advisement .
  • Pass/no pass grading is optional for elective courses above and beyond those electives satisfying requirements in the curriculum. The option must be exercised prior to the second class meeting. All other courses must be taken for a letter grade.
  • Following a request from the student, including an explanation of the extenuating circumstances involved, a professor may give a course grade of incomplete if circumstances justify an extension of time required to complete the course. A student with an incomplete grade in any course that is prerequisite to another course will not be allowed to enroll in the subsequent course until the grade of I in the prerequisite has been removed and replaced by a satisfactory grade. An incomplete must be resolved within one calendar year from the end of the semester in which the course was taken or it will convert to a grade of F.
  • An independent study course may be taken when a required course is not available in a timely manner. Approval for the requested independent study is required from the faculty member directing the independent study and the director of the PhD program. Independent studies are offered for students requiring mastery of additional content in order to proceed with the dissertation. The same approval process as noted above is required.
  • The grading system for courses in the doctoral program is the same as for the master’s program (Nursing, MSN ).
  • All requests for exceptions to these policies should be referred to the director of the PhD program.

Course Overload

Nine credits in the fall/spring semester and six credits in one summer session are recognized as a normal course load for full-time students. Students, as adult learners, have the right to make decisions related to their learning needs. However, faculty believe a course load above nine credits for fall/spring or six credits in a summer session has potential for creating academic jeopardy.

Students enrolling for more than nine credits during fall or spring semester or six credits in one summer session must have approval from their faculty advisor and the director of the PhD program.

Transfer Credit

The following guidelines have been established by the School of Nursing for acceptance of doctoral level course work taken previously at Widener University or at other institutions:

  • A maximum of two doctoral-level courses (6 credits) earned at another accredited institution within the five-year period preceding admission may be accepted for transfer upon admission to the doctoral program.
  • Courses taken prior to admission to the PhD program, either within or outside the university, will be accepted only if the student has earned a grade of A or B in the courses under consideration. Grades of satisfactory or pass are transferable as elective courses.
  • Once matriculated, a student may take one course (3 credits) at another academic institution for transfer credit.

The process in considering requests for transfer of graduate credit is as follows:

  • An official request for transfer credit must be submitted to the director of the PhD program. If transfer credit is requested in lieu of required courses in the program, a course syllabus must accompany the request.
  • Requests for transfer of graduate credit will be approved by the director of the PhD program upon recommendation by the Widener SON faculty member who is a content specialist on the topic.

Course Waiver

Doctoral students who have completed master’s or doctoral level courses comparable to courses in the PhD program are provided the opportunity to further enhance their knowledge base rather than repeating prior learning experiences.

A request for a 700-level waiver must be submitted to the director of the PhD program with the following documentation:

  • Official course transcript indicating a grade of B or better.
  • Evidence that the course was successfully completed within the last five years.
  • Graduate-level syllabus reflecting that the course is comparable to a specific required course in the doctoral program.

A maximum of six credits may be eligible for course waiver.

The request is presented to the Graduate Program Committee for consideration. Students receiving an approved course waiver are required to achieve/obtain the credits that would be allocated for the waiver through additional courses or independent study approved by their faculty advisor.

Dissertation Procedures

Information on dissertation procedures is available in the School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook. Students are expected to complete all required 800-level course work except an elective prior to enrollment in Dissertation Seminar II (NURS 901 ). Exception to this policy requires approval from the Director of the PhD program. Students are expected to then enroll in Dissertation Advisement (NURS 950 ) each consecutive fall, spring, and summer until the degree is granted. If another course becomes necessary to complete the dissertation, enrollment in NURS 950  may be waived while the student is taking that course.

A waiver from enrollment in NURS 950  may be granted by the student’s dissertation chairperson based on the student’s or chairperson’s availability for dissertation work. A waiver will not alter the seven year limitation for completion of the doctoral program. For more than one semester to be waived in a year, students must obtain a leave of absence that extends the time limit for completion of the doctoral degree.

Course of Study

The course of study consists of three related units designed to prepare competent scholarly nurse educators.

Unit I emphasizes nursing science: philosophy, epistemology, theoretical thinking, and knowledge synthesis, as well as nursing theory and nursing science development.

Unit II is related to general and nursing education. It consists of specialized courses in contemporary nursing education, curriculum development, teaching concepts, and evaluation methods. Students work closely with faculty in teaching/learning situations through seminars and projects.

Unit III addresses qualitative and quantitative design, statistical analysis, and data interpretation while fostering disciplined inquiry as students develop and implement a dissertation proposal that will contribute to the scientific basis of nursing education.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Goals

The primary goal of the doctor of nursing practice program is to prepare experts in specialized advanced nursing practice. This program prepares DNP students to design, implement, and evaluate evidence-based disease management care and to organize chronic illness care for individuals and populations. Graduates are prepared at the highest level for culturally competent, evidence- based, system-based care, interprofessional collaboration and leadership. The graduates of the DNP program will distinguish themselves by their ability to provide direct care, as well as to conceptualize new delivery models based in contemporary nursing science and informed by organizational, political, cultural, and economic tenets. The ultimate goals are improving patient and health care outcomes and reducing health disparities.

Outcomes

Graduates of the DNP program will:

  • Apply nursing science and theory with knowledge from ethics, biophysical, psychosocial, analytical, and organizational sciences to develop, evaluate, and improve advanced nursing practice.
  • Apply organizational, political, and economic sciences as well as ethical principles for ongoing improvement of health outcomes within health care systems.
  • Promote evidence-based practice by collaboratively conducting, translating, and disseminating research to guide improvements in nursing practice and outcomes of care.
  • Evaluate and use information systems and technology, considering ethical and legal implications, to support, improve, and transform health.
  • Assume leadership roles in the analysis and development of health care policies through advocacy, teaching, and active participation in policy making.
  • Promote collegial and collaborative relationships with inter-professional teams to improve patient and population outcomes.
  • Assume leadership roles in evidence-based health promotion and risk reduction/illness prevention practices in response to political, socioeconomic, cultural, and ethical issues in individual, aggregate, and population health.
  • Demonstrate skills in advanced practice roles through the synthesis of biophysical, psychosocial, behavioral, sociopolitical, cultural, economic, and nursing science knowledge as appropriate for the area of specialization.

Matriculation

A matriculated student is one who has been accepted officially into the doctoral program. Two doctoral level courses may be taken before matriculation. Students may be required to complete supplemental course work either prior to matriculation or as part of the course of studies. A graduate level course in epidemiology taken within the last five years at Widener University School of Nursing or elsewhere is a prerequisite or corequisite for DNP study. A nonmatriculated student is one who is taking a course for credit but has not yet been officially matriculated into the doctoral program.

DNP Post-Master’s Option

Admission

Graduates of nationally accredited master’s programs who hold or are eligible for advanced practice certification are invited to apply. Students may seek admission to the DNP program at multiple post-master’s and post-doctoral entry points. The number of credits required to complete the DNP program varies depending on previously earned degrees. Students may begin core course work during any semester. However, all prerequisite (level I master’s degree) courses must be satisfied prior to enrolling in advanced practice clinical course work.

Graduates of accredited master’s programs are invited to apply for admission by submitting evidence of:

  • Completed online application.
  • Transcripts from all previously attended higher education institutions.
  • Minimum of a 3.2 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale) in the MSN program.
  • Graduate statistics course with a grade of at least C (2.0).
  • Two references—one from an educator or an advanced practice nurse and one from an employer with a graduate degree.
  • Goal statement that highlights the applicant’s interests with emphasis on health care practice improvement.
  • Current national APRN certification in an advanced practice nursing role and population as appropriate.
  • Valid RN and APRN licenses.
  • Curriculum vitae.
  • Graduate level epidemiology course pre-/corequisite.

GRE scores are not required. International applicants and applicants whose native language is not English must submit Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores with a minimum score of 213 for the computer-based test or 550 for the paper test.

Post-Baccalaureate RN to DNP Family (Individual Across the Lifespan) CRNP Option and Adult-Gerontology CNS Option

Admissions

Graduates of nationally accredited baccalaureate programs are eligible to apply for admission by submitted evidence of:

  • Completed online application.
  • Transcripts from all previously attended higher education institutions.
  • Minimum of a 3.0 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale).
  • Undergraduate statistics course with a grade of at least C (2.0).
  • Two references—one from an educator or advanced practice nurse and one from an employer with a graduate degree.
  • Goal statement that highlights the applicant’s interests with emphasis on health care practice improvement.
  • Curriculum vitae.
  • Valid RN license.
  • Interview with a SON faculty member (arranged after a preliminary review of application materials).

Registration

See information pertaining to registration under the master of science in nursing program .

Academic Progress Time Limit

A maximum of seven calendar years from the date of matriculation is allowed for completion of the requirements for the doctoral degree.

Continous Enrollment

Students must enroll in both fall and spring semesters of the academic year through the completion of required DNP course work. Students must register for “DNP Project Advisement” each fall, spring, and summer until the capstone project is completed. Students who do not follow this policy will be dropped from the program.

Leave of Absence

Students who do not take at least one course per semester per academic year must submit a written request for a leave of absence, including the rationale, to the academic program director for the semester in which they are not enrolled. Those who do not do so may be dropped from the program. A leave of absence will extend the time limit for completion of the doctoral program by the length of the leave. The total cumulative leave time applied to extensions shall not exceed two academic years. Exceptions to this policy will be referred to the academic program director.

Reinstatement to the Program

Students who have withdrawn from the program may petition for readmission by filing a new application. Such requests must be sent to the academic program director no later than 90 days prior to the start of the academic semester in which the student expects to enroll.

Transfer Students

Students who are matriculated in another graduate program in nursing and wish to transfer will be considered on an individual basis.

Special Academic Policies

General policies are stipulated in the Widener University Graduate Student Handbook. Dismissal, readmission, academic requirements, and policies specific to the School of Nursing are found in the School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook.

Grading and Dismissal from the Program

  • Students are expected to maintain satisfactory progress toward a degree. A student’s doctoral studies record begins with the first course credited to the doctoral degree program and includes all subsequent courses.
  • DNP candidates are required to maintain at least a B (3.0) average. Only students with a 3.0 or better grade point average will graduate. Courses for which grades lower than B (3.0) are received may be repeated. No more than two repetitions total and only one repetition of a particular course is allowed. If a course is repeated, both grades will be recorded on the transcript, but only the most recent grade is used in calculating the grade point average. However, if a student is found to be in violation of Widener’s academic fraud policies, that student is prohibited from exercising the repeat-of-course option to remove the “F” grade (given as a result of fraud) from the GPA calculation. A student whose academic performance is considered inadequate will be dismissed from the program.
  • Conduct inconsistent with the ethical and professional standards of the discipline, whether it occurs before or after matriculation, is also grounds for dismissal from the program. Such conduct includes academic fraud. A student dismissed for academic fraud may no longer enroll in the graduate programs of the university and may not apply for admission into another division of the university.
  • When a course is taken as a prerequisite for doctoral study, the grade will be recorded on the transcript with an asterisk, indicating that the course is not included in calculating the doctoral program grade point average.
  • Pass/no pass grading is used for grading in “DNP Project Advisement.” Pass/no pass grading is optional for elective courses, and the option must be exercised prior to the second class meeting. All other courses must be taken for a letter grade.
  • Following a request from the student, including an explanation of the extenuating circumstances involved, a professor may give a course grade of incomplete if circumstances justify an extension of time required to complete the course. A student with an incomplete grade in any course that is prerequisite to another course will not be allowed to enroll in the subsequent course until the grade of I in the prerequisite has been removed and replaced by a satisfactory grade. An incomplete must be resolved within one calendar year from the end of the semester in which the course was taken or it will convert to an F.
  • Enrollment in an independent study course is an option available, depending on program of study needs and resources available. Independent study approval is at the discretion of the faculty member directing the independent study, the academic program director, Associate Dean for Graduate Nursing, and the Dean of the School of Nursing. 

  • The grading system for courses in the doctoral program is the same as for the master’s program (see Nursing, MSN ).
  • All requests for exceptions to these policies should be referred to the academic program director

Course Overload

Nine credits in the fall and spring semesters and six credits in one summer session are recognized as a normal course load for full-time students. Students, as adult learners, have the right to make decisions related to their learning needs. However, faculty believe a course load above nine credits for fall/spring or six credits in a summer session has potential for creating academic jeopardy. Students enrolling for more than nine credits during a fall or spring semester or six credits in one summer session must have approval from the academic program director.

Transfer Credit

The following guidelines have been established by the School of Nursing for acceptance of doctoral-level course work taken previously at Widener University or at other institutions:

  • A maximum of two doctoral-level courses earned at another accredited institution within the five-year period preceding admission may be accepted for transfer after admission to the doctoral program.
  • Courses taken prior to admission to the DNP program, either within or outside the university, will be accepted only if the student has earned a grade of A or B in the courses under consideration. Grades of satisfactory or pass are transferable as elective courses. The process in considering requests for transfer of graduate credit is as follows:
    • An official request for transfer credit must be submitted to and approved by the academic program advisor. If transfer credit is requested in lieu of required courses in the program, a course syllabus and official transcript must accompany the request.
    • Required graduate courses in statistics and conceptual models/theories may not be used for transfer credit, because they are prerequisites for admission.

Course Waiver

Doctoral students who have completed master’s or doctoral level courses comparable to courses in the DNP program are provided the opportunity to further enhance their knowledge base rather than repeating prior learning experiences. A request waiver must be submitted to the program director with the following documentation:

  • An official transcript of the course indicating a grade of B or better.
  • Evidence that the course was successfully completed within the last five years.
  • A graduate-level syllabus reflecting that the course is comparable to a specific required course in the doctoral program. A maximum of six credits may be eligible for course waiver. The request is presented to the Graduate Program Committee for consideration. Students receiving an approved course waiver are required to achieve/obtain the credits that would be allocated for the waived course(s) through additional courses or independent study approved by the faculty advisor.

DNP Project

Students are expected to complete all required DNP course work prior to enrollment in the DNP project course NURS 887 . The DNP project is designed to be responsive to health care system changes and population needs. DNP students will prepare an exhaustive document that substantiates that advanced practice DNP competencies and the DNP program outcomes have been achieved. The DNP project may include an individual comprehensive case study, population or systems change improvement projects and/or a comparative-effectiveness inquiry, and translation of evidence-based research into a practice, quality improvement project. Information on the DNP project procedures is available in the School of Nursing Doctoral (DNP) Student Handbook.

Course of Study

The doctor of nursing practice (DNP) course of study has three options: post-baccalaureate RN to DNP family (individual across the lifespan) CRNP option, post-baccalaureate RN to DNP adult-gerontology CNS option, and the DNP post-master’s option. The post-baccalaureate RN to DNP options build upon the BSN degree and require the student to complete the family (individual across the lifespan) CRNP population and role or the adult-gerontology CNS population focused role. The DNP program post-master’s builds upon the MSN degree and requires that the student has already completed an advanced practice curriculum and is licensed as a CRNP.

Level I (MSN requirements) must be completed prior to taking level II (DNP). A gap analysis will be performed, and selected courses not previously completed in an MSN course of study will be included in the DNP program of study. The MSN core prerequisites include three graduate-level courses: Advanced Health Assessment, Advanced Pathophysiology, and Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics (each 3 credits). The DNP level II requirements include an advanced clinical practice core and a DNP project advisement core. Courses are offered through a mix of online and in-class delivery. Full-time students with an MSN may complete the 37-credit program in two calendar years. Part-time students complete the degree on their own timeline within the seven-year time limit.

DNP OPTIONS

Nursing Practice, Post-Master’s Option, DNP  

Nursing, Health Systems Leadership, DNP  

Nursing, Post-Baccalaureate RN to Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Family (Individual Across the Lifespan) CRNP Option, DNP  

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